Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
MSNBCW 43
CNNW 16
CNBC 9
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 101
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101
memorial service for nelson mandela in south africa. we are starting with the economy. there have been solid job numbers and major revision for the gd approximate, and a strong end to the week on wall street. it has a bunch of experts predictioning that a steadily improving economy is on the horizon for the coming year. what would that mean politically? health care and obstruction are the clubs are choice for the two parties. they are beating each other up over both issues and both could be problems as well. the economy is the wild card right now. right now things are looking up. on friday we got word that they push the average jobs growth to 189,000 a month. not great, but not horrible. it's an improvement over 2012. unemployment is down to 7% down 18/10 of a point from this time last year and the lowest since november of 2008. we saw a big revision that was up 3.6% in the third quarter. that's a half percentage point better than 2012. there is a caveat. a good portion came from businesses building up inventory. they may end up stocking up so much, they don't need to buy as much. ther
the core of the economy today. that's what we did in the manufacturing sector the beginning of this economy and it really built the american middle class. it's what we need to do now. manufacturing jobs have gone away. it's fast-food jobs, retail jobs, service sector forming the core of the u.s. economy. those are the jobs we need to raise wages for. >> jack brings up an important point, seven out of ten growth occupyings through 2020 are low-wage jobs. this the american job market. the president has supported this, we have a lot of democrats who have come out and supported thchl i think it is much harder, actually, for conservatives to dismiss the minimum wage in the way they dismiss other parts of the social safety net. this is not an entitlement program. there's economic stimulus. i think this puts conservatives in a tough position. >> it does put republicans in a tough position. majority of republicans think this is a good idea. the president talked beauty this yesterday. he's been talking about this for as long as he's been in public life. how is it we get more hone into the hands of w
that these sanctions have absolutely crippled that economy. and so, what we would risk doing here in implementing a new round of sanctions is not just screwing up the negotiation, but sending a message to the iranian people, who are frankly way more pro-american than people might think -- >> right. >> -- that we aren't really serious about ultimately doing the deal they want. the hard-liners are isolated right now in iran, and we are, frankly, going to empower them if we show up at the table in the middle of these short-term negotiations with a new round of sanctions that even though they may take place in the future. this is about building confidence with the negotiators on the iranian side but also the iranian people. >> there's a political dimension to this. one of the polls we have, which is from reuters ipsos, on support for this deal show 2-1 support for it, which i was heartened to see. that doesn't necessarily reflect what i saw necessarily in the pundit class. but there's another moral dimension to this. i've heard a lot of people, along with some of your colleagues and commentators, we've got
it was all about. south africa had the economy, has the economy that is the greatest economic engine on the african continent and nelson n mandela did not dismantle that economy, he did not force the kind of redistribution of wealth at a pace in which his supporters wanted it to happen, he said now it's time for us to build, not to function as a revolution anymore. >> thanks, john harwood. we appreciate it. now, we are joined on the phone by robert johnson, who is a cnbc contributor, founder of the rlj and former chairman of b.e.t., old friend of mine. robert, you met nelson mandela many times, okay. how many times did you meet him, what are your thoughts tonight as he passes away? >> yeah, i had the great and humbling pleasure of meeting president mandela on a number of occasions, first with the former commerce secretary, late ron brown, and then i also accompanied president clinton on his historic trip to sub-saharan africa and of course when president mandela came to the united states seeking to raise funds to continue to fight apartheid and support his charities. the one thing,
, and the result is an economy that's become profoundly unequal. >> mr. obama in professor mode had stats. america's top 10% now earn half of all u.s. income, up he said from 1/3. ceos he said used to make 20 to 30 times what workers do, now he said make 273 times more and the top 1% of americans who have net worts now 288 times what a typical u.s. family has. >> that is a dangerous and growing inequality and lack of upward mobility that has jeopardized middle class america's basic bargain, that if you work hard, you have a chance to get ahead. >> reporter: he wants at least a higher minimum wage and an extension of emergency unemployment benefits. the president said when budget talks get going obama care will not be on the table because, he said, his plan is ending one of america's worst inequities, unequal access to health care. larry. >> thanks very much, steve handelsman. we appreciate it. i'm going to say it again with all due respect to mr. president, growing income inequality is not the greatest challenge of our time. we need strong economic growth. that's the biggest challenge. i need a ri
in the economy. the fed has been fighting that trying to keep rates down to ensure the economy is really getting going, not just one time only, but steady in creating a lot of jobs. now if today's data is a sign that things are on track in this country, i don't know what it is. i just don't know what is good data. after i saw this data. so you have to figure the fed stops fighting the tide unless rates rise and this will present more competition for stocks and it can reverse the terrific data we got today and that's what janet yellen has to be worried about. the successor to bernanke. maybe the data is aberrant. we haven't seen a surge in consumer spending. we really haven't seen a strong employment growth, and while we keep talking about a budget compromise today, forget it, it's not a surety. it may not do anything other than resolve the ridiculous sequester that's so twisted government spending. frankly, i tried to dispense with this as quick as i can. why? anyone can trace it. so let me tell you what you don't know. you have heard about this tapering game for so long. i know you don't care t
is the economy. >> the economy remains the single biggest concern. >> washington consistently failed to act. >> these asperities have become too big to ignore. >> making an action across the board. >> raising minimum wage, assistance to the long-term unemployed. something of a warning call to the american dream. >> it is not simply a moral claim. >> it's rooted in the personal. >> so we can make a difference on this. >> there are 19 shopping days to find health insurance on the government exchange. 29,000 people reportedly completed the application and selected a health plan on the federal exchange on sunday and monday but we don't exactly know how many of them completed the purchase and have paid their first premium. today, president obama told young supporters at the affordable care act youth summit how they can help make health care reform a success. >> the truth is, that for your friends and family, the most important source of information is not going to be me. it's going to be you. they are going to trust you if you're taking them on a website, walking them through it, saying, look, a
the economy. they should have tried to fix the economy. instead they focused time on a broken program by pulling in conservative concepts into a health care plan. >> that's -- >> oh. >> that's the reality. the main fundamental promises. keeping your plan, your doctor, saving $2500 per family per year, not true. you may trust him but you are one of five people in the country that believe him. >> you know me. >> i totally agree. there was over simplification. >> why are you having a hard time admitting it's not true? >> just the individual market there are ebbs and flows. that's natural. not everyone can keep their plan. >> they knew, read the november 2 edition of the wall street journal. they were debating in jewel of 2010 whether to tell the truth. they decided against it. here you are. he could have said it better. could have done this. they knew from the beginning. it was over simplification. absolutely true. >> they crafted the talking points to be that way. don't lie, emily. >> emily? >> i'm not going to agree. >> that's the truth. they knew it was going to happen. they didn't wa
for it with those fees much more incremental. that helps reduce fiscal drag on the economy. my information is about the same as yours but with one important difference. the sequester doesn't end in 2015. the sequester is slated to keep going through, i think, 2021. >> yes. >> while this would definitely change the sequester for a couple of years, it does at least in terms of current law come back. >> once you break it, you own it. i was in the grand rudman days. once you break it, you own it. it's interesting, dave, i accept the fact that the defense hawks didn't want the sequester, some budget movement has to occur. whether these user fees go through or not remains to be seen. but it's interesting because my friend jared bernstein and all his colleagues at the congressional budget office told us how bad it would be if we actually used the sequester and had budget caps, how it would damage the economy, how it would kill 700,000 jobs. and what's interesting, it didn't kill 700,000 jobs. actually jobs are rising. actually i venture to say in true milton friedman free market art laffer economies, i th
? >> describe the state of how you see the south african economy and the relationship between the united states and this current south african government. >> it's a dynamic moment in the relationship, chuck. you know that the fastest growing economies on the globe are in africa. south africa is the economy that has been stagnant over the course of the last few years following the recession that all of us are struggling to recover from. i will tell you that over 600 american countries on the ground here in south africa are bullish and optimistic about the future here spent a lot of time talking to both investors and young people who were entering the job market here and they are optimistic about the opportunities, but they know there real challenges particularly around education to make certain there is a sustainable economy and the shared prosperity this this country. >> one of the things i want to do with you, you were talking with andrea off camera and i am glad you brought up the cold war point. history and a reminder of what that -- how frankly we were behind the times as a government when
't worked. the president pours a trillion dollars into the nation's economy when you divided it out, it was about $400,000 per child. the problem with a government stimulus is you pick the winners and loser rs. with this stimulus i'm talking about, a free market stimulus, you simply leave the money in the hands of those who have earned it, so the customers have pickeded out the successful people. those people get more money. like i met a young man, young african man who has his own restaurant. his first question is do you have any tax breaks for me for my business. that's what what would do. help people in business and trying. >> but i don't have to tell you senator, republicans have a steep hill to climb in inner city neighborhoods. in detroit in november, 97% of detroit voters supported president obama. 2% voted for rom thi. the black unemployment rate nationally is still 12.5% and right now, president obama is calling out the gop for what he says is your party to extend long-term unemployment benefits. take a look at what he says. >> for decades, congress has voted to offer relie
. they've got a good monetary policy, lower corporate tax rates than we have. their economy is growing better. but when it comes to health care, they come across the border. >> well, the wealthy and those that can afford to come across the border do. but those that can't get access to health care in america are stuck in emergency rooms with high temperatures waiting to get their children taken care of. i concede this is a mess. we may have tried too much too fast and on a partisan basis. i've said we should hit the reset button and open ourselves up to new ideas. and larry kudlow always has new ideas, even if they're conservative. >> i appreciate that and appreciate your honesty. republicans are licking their chops about the elections coming up in 2014, roughly a year from now. we're going to talk more about that later in the show. what i want to ask you is, what can you do for a simple, transparent, compassionate response to the breakdown of obama care? i have an answer. but i want you to go first. >> well, with any health reform proposal, we have to look first at the root cause of th
families more vulnerable to the anxiety of today's economy than a broken health care system. so we took up the fight because we believe in america nobody should have to worry about going broke because someone and their family got sick. we believe we are a better country than a country where we allow every day 14,000 americans to lose their health care coverage or wherever i year tens of thousands of americans die because they don't have health care. we felt we were better than that, that is why we took this on. [ applause ] >> and, that's what the government lost a little bit over the last couple of months and our focus rightly had to shift for its working 24/7 to fix the website healthcare.gov for the new marketplace. and today the website is working well for the vast majority of users. more pop up and when we do we'll fix those too. but what we also know is after just the first month, despite the problems in the rollout, about half a million people across the country are poised to gain health care january 1st, for the very first time, we know that. half a million people. [ applause ] >>
economy and creating more jobs for the american people. that's where the focus is, not more government programs. >> we have a responsibility as american people, people who have played by the rules and lost their job through no fault of their own. and need these benefits in order to survive. >> nbc's capitol hill correspondent kelly o'donnell joins me. the budget is the critical issue but the debate over extending the unemployment benefits set to threaten all of this and the "washington post" reports there are capitol hill aides who say tlsz little chance of it passing before congress leaves for their break. >> reporter: there's a weariness with so many of these fiscal deadlines we've had. we're talking about unemployment benefits for the longest term unemployed, people who really have had a hard time for a long time and congress is not necessarily in the mood to make this a line in the sand issue. clearly some democrats want to see action on this to extend the benefits and some republicans do not in part, for example, one point of view from rand paul of kentucky, saying that by extendi
employment rate hit a five-year low of 7%, an encouraging sign for the u.s. economy. the job creation news sent stocks soaring today, a rare sign. the dow added 199. the s&p 500 gained 20. the nasdaq finished ahead 29. for the week, the dow lost 0.4 of a percentage of a point. to break down the jobs report for us is melissa francis in new york. she's the most of "money with melissa francis" on the fox business network. the jobs number better than expected. still not robust, but pretty good? >> absolutely. it was better than expected. most economists were looking for less than 200,000 jobs, 203,000 is what came through. 7% unemployment. that is the 60th straight month we have seen employment over 7%. if you look at the average amount of money earned per hour, the number of hours worked per week, those ticked up slightly. and the participation rate is so important. last month it was at a 35-year low. it has ticked up, but just slightly. 63% of people out there consider themselves part of the workforce, either working or even looking for a job. that means that the rest of the population has g
/3 in that pew survey believe americans view greater involvement in the global economy is a greater thing. meaning when america is a strong country it's better for the world. >> we have seen that throughout history. and when we see economies like china coming up it's important to have our own economy keep going. people like to complain about america, but when something happens in the world, the philippines, the typhoon there, when something happens in the world guess who is the first country to go, the united states military and the charities. we are divide as a country on political lines. republicans and democrats are split on how they see our influence in the world. the democrats believe the president has broken his promises. he said we would leave iraq, afghanistan and close guantanamo bay. republicans are saying don't be apologizing for guantanamo bay when you are on foreign tour. bill: what do you think the apology tour did to our view of ourselves in the world? >> when you have the president of the united states going over to other countries and telling countries that we are the one
. this economy wants to take off and things want to grow. we want to rebuild our manufacturing base. to my mind it's not just the minimum wage, that's part of it. we can't for get those who have been left behind. we have this very dangerous thing called structural unemployment in this country. i don't think we've seen this since the great depression. it's the mcdonald's versus apples. companies require fewer people and investors are doing better and private equity firms are doing better but leaving in its wake people who aren't trained for the economy and have nowhere to go. that's the reality of where we are and the economy will proceed more in this direction as opposed to the mcdonald's side. >> that's what's scary in the jobs we have now, our largely service jobs and largely low wage majority of the groupz created out of the recession are low wage service jobs. does that responsibility to push the wage up, does that fall just to the states and federal level or do you think corporations themselves have a responsibility to their workers to provide a living wage? >> of course corporations ought
the entire country. it will be good for our economy. >> but, as the unemployment rate is heading in the right direction, will this wage hike have jobs taking a hike? hi, everyone, this is "bulls and bears." let's get right to it. the bulls and bears. gary b. smith. tracy burns. john nas max ferris. along with bernard whitman. will pushing the minimum to the max push out jobs just as they're coming back? >> yes, absolutely, this is the wrong thing to do in an economy that's showing some signeds of recovery. remember, they're targeting the wrong people. this is a great union and democratic slogan to say, look at the ceo, how much he's making. you can't raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour? take mcdonald's nor example. they will tell you, they don't set the wages for the local franchises. these are your moms and pops. these are your neighbors out there. they can't afford -- they don't have huge margins to raise the wages to $15 an hour. remember, if you want to help poverty this isn't the way to do it. the earned income tax credit does it. take this out of politics. take this out of unions. rem
need to survive in the world and compete in the world and we're now in a global economy competing for skills, that we need to be making progress on this chart rather than go behind. what also has people nervous is this comes despite many years now of the united states being focused on this question, no child left behind, other pieces of legislation, common core debate, state efforts and we're not necessarily making huge progress. >> no noticeable improvement. >> but rankings have very little to do with the success of individuals in later life, much less the success of the economy. there's this false equation that companies with great educational systems, is that true of japan? absolutely not. take a country like -- >> fewer people than new york city. >> yes. >> it's got half as many people as belgium and that's why it makes it ridiculous, comparing them to a country of five million people -- >> so we should ignore them? >> yes, we should ignore them. we put more and more money into schools with really little to show for it. >> that's the opposite, in fact. because what's happened
're face ing this country. a big part of the economy also involves health care. what we don't know yet, despite the president's promises, is not only how the health care industry will respond but what big companies and small companies are doing to see that their best interests are served by all of this, and we can't see how that might play out by the end of his first term. terms of employment. yes, there are encouraging signs that unemployment is going down, but the middle class is still widely separated from the 1% at the top. we know we don't have the skill set in our economy. there is just another report this past week about where america stands when it comes to the rest of the world in terms of educational skills. we have a lot of work to be done. so these are decimal points we're talking about. it's not really dealing with the larger, big picture issue about the american economy. >> katty kay, a final point on this? the president talked about a higher wage hike this week, and it's just not going to happen. it's not going to happen if you look at the current political climate. so a
be a big win for the u.s. economy going forward. explain. >> we know the human toll. you heard the mayor bing talk about it. kevyn orr talked about it. no doubt. human beings lives are at stake and promises were made. but you have -- and dive just mentioned the previous guest, this unhoe live alliance where unions push politicians, who did them favors, making the unions stronger and able to push in the same policies. this beneficial cycle of power sharing that really helped to bankrupt not just detroit but a wheel lot of other places on the brink. these were very -- promises made over a long period of time, and if we were being honest about it, up -- people could see this coming for a long perfected of time but you had this powerful power structure, and this is what they -- >> talk about a human toll, a big toll on taxpayers. >> mayor bing said, you weigh the consequences and, yes, there's some part is going to come out hurt, and this particular caves it was the unions, but -- >> it's not the first time, right? in the case of the private companies -- we can go back to the days of steel a
. it could cost a nation. >> congressional budget office estimates the law will boost the economy by more than 3%, cut the deficit by almost $200 billion over ten years, savings from new workers, new businesses and new taxpayers. those numbers were not lost on the party's fiscal hawks. >> i'm not aware of any trade association, any major or minor business group that doesn't recognize we need more people, business, and fiscal workers. >> and they recognized the historic vote, with the republican party's renewed political life. >> i know that everything is not going to change in a year. but if we don't start now we're not going to have anymore success in four years, eight years or 12 years. >> joining me now back in this reality, is the president of the national council. based on the surprising staffing choice, janet, this staffing choice, staffing choice of members of congress don't normally make news, but this one did. it got tons of attention, the senators tweeting congratulations. why all the hubub about a staffer? >> well, i think it is important, as somebody who worked on capitol hill
of the financial crisis. but the job market is getting better. our economy is improving. we have doubled our production of clean energy. doubled our production of traditional energy sources. we are on the brink of being as close to energy independent as any country our size could be in a very long time. we still have the best universities on earth, best researches and scientists on earth and most innovative companies on earth. and we're still the envy of the world and the one indispensable nation. i continue to have great confidence in our capacity to solve our problems. there is a specific challenge that we've got. and that is a congress. and this city, washington, that is grid locked and spends too much time worrying about the next election, and not enough time worrying about the next generation. and you know, the solution to that is ultimately what was envisioned by our founders and what jack kennedy understood, as well. and that's the american people. you know, we go through these periods where our politics gets all boll objectioned up. and sometimes we're nostalgic about the past. >> i
. but the economy is certainly better today than it was in 2009, so -- >> i want to put dollars and cents to this. this is the difference in the cbo projected savings. they're projects $222 billion in a year from medicare and medicaid from this slowing of health care costs. the sequester is $87.9, and the cuts to food stamps is $23.8 billion. >> i have been on twitter all day about this, they can't find a single positive thing to say about the law. literally it could bring people's health care costs down to zero, they could cure cancer, and conservatives would be shouting from the rooftops that it's a disaster. i think this california thing is hysterical. in part because it's the sort of natural conclusion of the republican panic about this. they vote in mass against the law even though it originated in republican ideas. they vote to try to repeal it unsuccessfully. the website they think will sink it, and then they just throw toilet paper at it. >> and in the absence of a website that wasn't malfunctioning, they created their own website to malfunction, right? they weren't served a gift of a mal
is bill clinton talking about one of his most famous campaign quotes from 1992. it's not it's the economy, stupid. in ukraine it looks like a cold war up rising stuck in a debate over democracy. we will go live to kiev for the latest. good morning from washington. this is "the daily rundown." coming up, a deep dive into bit coin and how it could fit into the world's phi national future. this is a wild new currency gaining steam online. let's get to the first reads of the morning. you can call the last month and a half for the republican party. after losing the last two contests after the shut down in the midst of a battle in the party, republicans clearly have the political swlj it comes to health care. they are in a bit of a quandary. they believe healing care is a winning issue, they are not sure of the next move. the president will test out some of the themes of the upcoming state of the union address and will provide a window into where he focuses energies over the next three years. this is the need for upward mobility. the president will explain how the health care law fits into his
that in this speech on the economy earlier. but this is a different strategy we're looking at here with these young people. >> earlier speaking before the group center for american progress and key allies of this president this afternoon, a short time from now, the focus will be on the young individuals and comes with a back drop of numbers that are concerning to members of the administration. a harvard kennedy school of government said a majority of these young mill lennials are afraid the affordable care act will cost them more but help them less. the care won't be as good. that's an issue they are trying to turn around and turn into their favor as the president prepares to speak at this youth summit. they will focus on today the issue that people under the age of 26 get to keep their parent's coverage, get to be covered by their parents with preexisting conditions will be covered as well. these are issues that young people will relate to. on top of that was a statistic the white house aides are often note us about, the fact six in ten americans in their health care will pay less than they do a m
in our economy. >> joining me today, "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, former white house press secretary and founding partner off-almost said founding father -- founding father and partner of inside agency robert gibbs, congressional reporter for buzz feed and political reporter and white house correspondent at the "huffington post" sam stein. we talked a lot about the pizza versus the pizza box. after the gop autopsy, the republican conviction they didn't actually need to change the product they were selling, they just needed to change the marketing. it's unbelievable me, the whole 47% thing clearly has not made a dent. nowhere do you see that in a more pronounced fashion than republican talking points on unemployment. >> largely, if you ask most members of the gop, 47% to them wasn't a gaffe, it's a belief. i heard it in debates i had with people all of last year before the tape was uncovered. i do think, look, this is one of those things that the republicans will either learn this the easy way or the hard way. i remember watching these debates about unemployment insura
to that breaking news on the economy, americans are getting back to work, 203,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november, and the unemployment rate ticked two notches lower to 7%. that's the lowest unemployment rate in five years. our chief business correspondent christine romans is here to break down the numbers. better than expected, so should we feel absolutely completely good about this? >> i saw some broad-based strength in these numbers from warehousing to retail to transportation to construction so there's broad based health care as well, that's important here. carol, the trend, i always talk about the trend how important that is. you look at the last four months on average, 200,000 plus jobs over the last four months and carol we are on track this year for the most jobs created since 2005. we're on track for more than 2 million jobs created and that is a marked improvement from what we've seen in recent memory, so this is good news, a 7% unemployment rate is still good news. you'll hear people talk about their concerns about this underemployment rate, 13.2%, people who are unemployed
struggling, it will actually harm our economy. unemployment insurance is one of the most effective ways there is to boost our economy. when people have money to spend on basic necessities, that means more customers for our businesses and ultimately more jobs. >> the republicans meantime remain focused on obama care. north carolina congress woman renee elmhurst delivered the gop's response earlier today. >> families who work hard and by play the rules deserve some basic choices, fairness and relief. that's why the house has passed legislation to delay the individual mandate for all americans and let you keep the plan you like. these proposals are among the dozens of house passed jobs bills awaiting action in the democratic-run senate. >> meanwhile, good news on the latest jobs report to share. 203,000 of them created in november, just 1,000 shy of the number of jobs created in october. unemployment fell by.3 down to 7%, the lowest in five years. kristen welker is at the white house for us. kristin, i'm curious how the white house is interpreting these numbers. all good? >> well, look, th
on one sixth of our economy, whatever comes up we're just going fix it. >> reporter: meanwhile on capitol hill republicans kept pound being away with their criticism saying that obama care ultimately is more than just this website. >> the president's health care law continues to wreak havoc on american families, small businesses and our economy. it's not just broken website. this bill is fundamentally flawed. causing people to lose the doctor of their choice, causing them to lose their health plan and if that want isn't enough having to pay much higher prices at the same time. >> reporter: also today, larry, inspector general that oversees the irs says the irs may have some proble some problems implementing the health care in refunds. the treasury said they are aware of the problems and been on top of them. they say they will have it under control and be able to prevent massive fraud inside the irs piece of the affordable care act roll out, larry. >> what's going to happen with this back end business called, what is it 836 i think it's called, section 836. 834. it connects the websites to
fuego, with demand outstripping supply. and if the economy keeps improving, things will get even better for the hotel operators. hilton is, in fact, the world's largest hotel chain. it's under a number of brands, not just hilton. waldorf astoria, conrad, doubletree, embassy suites, hampton, homewood suites. now it's expected to price next thursday at $18 to $20 a share. i want to give you a head start to focus on this one. a little over a week, stock's trading under the symbol hlt. at the midpoint of that range, this would be a $19.3 billion company and the stock would be fairly expensive by most metrics. however, i still think it makes sense for you to try to get in on the hilton deal. let me tell you why. i think it's likely the stock will pop on the first day of trading, as has been the pattern for the vast majority of ipos this year. some of that is because hilton is private equity backed ipo by blackstone. blackstone took the chain private in 2007 and now they're spinning it off again as a private company. last month we saw another hotel play from blackstone come public. i'm talkin
warren, thank you. we're going to turn to the economy. wall street is reacting positively despite today's better than expected jobs report. i say despite because series of positive results could signal it's time to turn the policies. a net gain of 203,000 jobs. the unemployment rate slid to five-year low of 7%. over the past four months, the economy gained an average of more than 200,000 jobs each month. that's up sharply from the previous four months. okay, if it's jobs friday, it times for our dynamic economic duo, jared bernstein and peter marchi, even you have to feel good about this jobs report. >> i think this is a good jobs report given what we've been through. >> easy, jerry. >> i would like to have more jobs and be around 300,000, 400,000 but i think next year will be even better. so much so i think it is time to start to withdraw the stimulus and start focusing on budgetary priorities in terms of what do we really want to do. what do we really need and worry less about stimulus but more about the fundamentals. we need to rebuild bridges. let's not do that because it's stimulus
that this is something that's so harmful to jobs to the economy and to the access of health care and quality of life. >> wish i had more time. we'll stay on it and watch closely. appreciate it. >> thank you. >> my next guest hacks into computer sites for a living. he's a white hat hacker. he says absolutely no security was built into the health care.gov website so your personal information may be at risk. so should you ever sign on? we'll get to it next. later -- >> a dangerous and growing inequality and lack of upward mobility that jeopardized middle class america's basic bargain that if you work hard you have a chance to get ahead. i believe this is the defining challenge of our time. >> class warfare is back. president obama attacking the success of hard-working americans. we'll explain what he wants to do now. plus he's out, done, finished. martin bashir offered his resignation after the despicable comments he made about governor sarah palin. we'll tell you what he said and what his reasoning is. plus senator rand paul, bob beckel and andrea tantaros on this busy night of news. hoo-hoo. hoo-hoo.
this is the defining challenge of our time. making sure our economy works for every working american. that's why i ran for president. it was the center of last year's campaign. it drives everything i do in this office. >> so, how has the economy done since he's been in office? the top 1% incomes are up 31.4%. the bottom 99% grew only 4% between 2009 and 2012 it the top 1% earned 19.3 of all household income. in 2012, their largest share since 1977. we will have a raucous debate between bob and eric. i can feel it coming. >> and you now with that lead of yours. >> what is wrong with the top of that lead? >> that was a bunch of crap. because rich people got their tax breaks. until they finally got them put back in. when obama inherited the office, rich people were getting big tax breaks. >> you mean the tax breaks that b obama kept? >> yes. >> now they're not is what you're saying? >> yes, they took the tax breaks away. >> how do you explain the top 1% is outpassing by seven times what the lower 99 are making? >> here's exactly what obama -- >> believe it or not, president obama has actually widened the
care debate is over, that we've got to make this work. the real issue is going to be the economy. the average wages of working americans declined in the past ten years, how do rewe restore growth in the pocket books not just in the stock market for the american people? we've got to lean in on that and start addressing the concerns of parents trying to send their kids to college, get them jobs. retirement security, these are things that have been put on the side and it's really a discredit that congress is focusing on middle class concerns. >> congressman, to that point, we're seeing a rising movement across the country in support of raising the minimum wage, something that republicans and congress seem to have no interest in doing. but are you hearing from constituents that that's a concern to them? do you think ultimately we could see enough pressure brought to bear that even republicans in congress admit that we need to raise the minimum wage that it would be good for the economy and lift a lot of people out of poverty? >> absolutely. when you see the stories about food service
if good news about the economy is bad news for stocks or is the opposite the case, as the economy improves should we like stocks more? it's a first-class quandary that we have to dive into headlong on "mad money" if we're going to figure out the market's move. it's distracted and a parlor game and we find you the best stocks and the best opportunities. the only focus on the fed's next move the last three years, you missed some of the single best moments to invest in our lifetimes. i regard that as terrible. i regard it as shameful because this fed-centric world presumes that the market is one big stock that is sent higher or lower by ben bernanke and janet yellin and it's the market as a marionette. my favorite credo is the opposite. the stocks represent companies and the companies march to many different drum e not just the fed drummer. some companies do better than higher interest rates and like the minerals and oils and most important, many companies do better because their managements are smart or incentive to create value. if you spend all of your time waiting for the fed to tell you
economy works for every working american. that's why i ran for president. the basic bargain at the heart of our economy. this increasing inequality is most pronounced in our country. a child may never be able to escape poverty, because she lacks a decent education or health care. that should offend all of us. what drives me is a grandson, a son, a father, an american, is to make sure that every striving, hard-working, optimistic kid has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. dr. king once said, of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking. not anymore. if you still don't like obama care, you owe it to the american people to tell us what you are for. not just what you're against. >>> here at 30 rock, we are counting down to tonight's lighting of the famous rockefeller christmas tree. that war on christmas, a lot of hum bug, of course. but as president obama prepares to join in the national tree-lighting on friday, he's got a few other things to attend to. first, including a long list of policy goals that he wants to achieve for the american
, they won't need social services, and the economy, the system will be paying less into social services as a whole. so 50 cents for a burger is really not that big of a deal. >> all right. nbc's katy tur, thank you for that report. i want to now bring in an associate professor of economics at umass. he also penned "the new york times" op-ed "the minimum we can do." he says, while we can set a wage floor using policy, should we, or leave it to the market. thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks for having me. >> so i wanted to start, one of the things i thought was interesting in your op-ed is you talk about the fact we used to have a variety of mechanisms for setting the wage. it wasn't just up to employers. some of those mechanisms have gone away over time. explain that. >> yeah, for most of the post-world war ii era, wages in the u.s. were set using a combination of things like the minimum wage as well as collective bargaining, unions, who actually used to help set wages together with employers. that is not the case today. unions and the private sector have virtually disappeared in m
market is getting better, our economy is improving. we have doubled our production of clean energy, doubled our production of additional energy sources. we are on the brink of being as close to energy independent as any country our size could be in a very long time. we still have the best universities, the best researchers and scientists, the best workers on earth and the most innovative countries on earth and we're still the envy of the world and the one indispensable nation. so i continue to have great confidence in our capacity to solve our problems. there is a specific challenge that we've got, and that is a congress and this city, washington, that is gridlocked and spent too much time worrying about the next election and not enough time worrying about the next generation. and, you know, the solution to that is ultimately what was envisioned by our fathers and what jack kennedy understood as well and that's the american people. you know, we go through these periods where our politics gets all mixed up and sometimes we're nostalgic about the past. >> i am. >> i know you are. but
the economy is still weak and i think we can accomplish that the next couple of days. >> congressman chris van hollen says he puts the chances of a deal at 50-50 and that any cuts to federal employees' pensions would be a deal breaker, at least for him. >> you cannot be asking federal employees to bear the share of the burden that they're asking for here as part of an agreement when you're not asking, for example, agribusinesses that get huge taxpayer subsidies to have a contribution. >> of course he has a slew of federal employees in his district. joining me now dnc congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz of florida. thanks for being here. now, the "washington post" quotes the head of a bipartisan think tank that this could be declared a victory is an indicator of how low the process has sunk. they haven't really done anything except avoid another crisis. and so i guess for me is are we just doing another version of kicking the can down the road or is there some sort of potential detente between the two parties when it comes to the budget? >> it doesn't appear there's going to be some sort of
torper in the economy. up until now they said the american economy has been so inventive and resilient it has been able to function even in problems with student graduates this and that not up to snuff. in the future it might not be able to. the skilled labor force will have an impact on the economy. i would have thought it always had. but now it hasn't. >> high technology companies are actually drawing on educated immigrant labor, not necessarily here native american labor. again point to go the failure of our schools to educate our kids. >> but there's a difference. see what we have, it sort of mirrors our economy in many ways, the study shows us that the top-performing u.s. private schools outperform anybody in the world. so it's not that -- our top students are still top. the problem is, it's the vast majority of our students that are going into our public school system where we're underperforming. >> when you compare those to other countries like in japan, for instance, i was just talking to a japanese colleague here before we came on, it's actually considered better to get into a
industry is a $200 billion industry and one of the most profitable industries in our economy today. mcdonald's, for example, which pays its workers a median wage of less than $9 an hour posted $5.5 billion in profits last year and compensated its ceo almost $14 million. so clearly, the money is there in the corporation and the question is how do we get that to trickle down to workers above poverty wages. >> it makes sense and on the other end, the way the business models is set up, that's not the way the world is working right now and they've talked about this debate. you heard katy say it, and economists that i've seen crunch the numbers have said the cost of a burger and fries would go up 10% to 20%. the franchise association says 25% to 50% and that ultimately, though, their big argument says this will lead to the loss of entry-level jobs. does it have to? >> it doesn't have to, and we know that when you give workers a wage and especially low-wage workers. wage increase and they spend that money and put it right back into the economy. those are the workers that eat at the establishm
sales promotions. christine romans is here with the good news. >> automakers saw the economy is getting better and they think it will keep getting better next year and that is great for auto sales. when you look at car sales, it really gives you a clue into the minds of the consumer. you don't just spend $38,000 on something casually. you need access to credit, confidence about your job, a ro reason to do it. very good numbers for november. 14% year over year increase for gm, that's great. ford, up 7%. chrysler, up 16%. and it wasn't just the incentives. there were good incentives. about $2500 on average was the incentive to get out there and buy a car. big advertising for black friday. a lot of people went to the showrooms, that helped. but this is really a recovering economy story. and pent up demand story. and you're hearing it from the automakers who are looking at the a good 2014, as well. their stocks reflecting it, too. >> absolutely. so the auto bailout was a good idea? we all remember back in 2008 when mitt romney said let detroit go bankrupt and there was a big partisan fight.
what does that say about our economy? >> well, first of all, the data we get on -- from the retailers at this time of year is almost always contradictory and confusing. they are not always completely forthcoming because they don't want to discourage people from shopping. i think the most interesting thing we saw over the weekend, besides the fact that a number of retailers decided to be open on thanksgiving day, was that 40% of the sales were on-line. in a sense, cyber monday is an accra nism. cyber monday dates from the day when people had slow internet at home and came to work on monday after thanksgiving and ordered. now so many have broadband people are shopping on-line all the time and the retailers are scrambling to catch up with consumers. >> i shop on-line too in light of the incidents you see every black friday, always seems to be a fight somewhere and that can't help retailers, right? >> right. well, of course not. but i think people like going to the stores. we at the "wall street journal" and others did stories following teenagers around the mall and that's social. you can
. >> or economic numbers which they could get some better ones this week possibly. >> they said the economy's supposed to grow, according to baron's. it was supposed to grow 1.7% -- >> or find another bin laden. >> this might change everything this is david fluff, is that his name, david fluff? >> close enough. >> on this week talking about when we expect obama care to work. i think this is a bright part of the rainbow, whatever that means. >> may take until 2017 when this president leaves office. you're going to see almost every state in this country running their exchanges and expanding medicaid. i think it will work really well then. >> there you go, 2017. that's right around the corner, kids. >> it's going to be awesome when he's out of office, that's what he's saying. >> if we just believe in the greater good, this will work out. >> just remember, it took medicare a good six or seven years before it got settled down to work. >> now it works. >> don't you think it does? >> no. >> you want to privatize it, don't you? >> i would like to. >> that's not what paul ryan says. >> let's not min
's health care law continues to wreak havoc on families, small businesses and economy. it's not just a broken website. this bill is fundamentally flawed. >> our republican colleagues have focused so much attention, in fact, obsessed in killing the affordable care act they failed to focus on real needs of americans. >> smashing the speed limit. investigators say derailed commuter train traveling three times the legal speed heading into that dangerous curve 82 miles an hour. still unknown was the crash that killed four passengers caused by mechanical failure or operator error. >> for the train to be going 82 miles an hour around that curve is just a frightening thought. >> we showed you amazon's delivery of the future but drone delivery raises important questions. we'll have more. >> what could go wrong? >> good day, everyone. i'm andrea mitchell in new york. the obama administration trying to get past disas true rollout kicking off a new campaign promoting benefits of the health care law. robert gibbs msnbc contributor and former white house press secretary during the president's firs
have given this president so much power to control so much of our economy. i mean, one sixth of our economy. and the fact that he has failed, i think he has to be accountable for this. and -- >> well, mercedes, you're right. >> pr is not going to work for the president. >> mercedes, this is bad management, we have to hold the president accountable for what happened with that website. but that is not the whole story. the story is about trying to improve a health care problem. >> i am telling you, juan, mark my words, and i'll bet any amount for your charity of choice. you cannot fix this plan. it is unfixable. because it is predicated on the redistribution of wealth. the healthy will pay for the unhealthy and the insured. and you still have 30 million uninsured. >> did you tell president bush that about prescription drug benefits? >> yeah, i was against the prescription drug benefits -- >> and against social security, too? >> no, don't put words in my mouth. you're getting cranky, i see those gray hairs coming out. don't make fun of this gray hair, i worked hard for this. >> well, yo
economic growth and growing the economy and giving everyone a chance to go ahead. people don't want redistribution. but with the republican party offering very little his message resonates with the democratic base. >> if you don't think we should raise the minimum wage, let's hear your idea to increase people's earnings. you don't think of child should have access to preschool, tell us what you would do differently to give them a better shot. martha: increase the inmum wage and increase childhood education. >> he spoke as if he hadn't been president. he spoke as if he's on the outside of his own presidency. he has been president for five years. what we have seen in the speech and what we'll continue to see is more class warfare because this is who he is. he is a leftist and essentially a socialist. so he believes in waging the class warfare. when he talks about -- when he spoke about the american dream he has a warped leftist view of that dream. he believes the state should use its to force greater income he:quality. when government do that it's essentially called communism. the ame
at managing the economy, okay at managing crime, not so great managing corruption. as eugene says, what he really stepped forward was his moral vision. he was a brilliant communicator. we expected that of obama. obama, in fact, has not been as president as brilliant a communicator as expected. he hasn't provided the same kind of moral vision in his speeches about health care, the economy -- >> recently. >> lately in touch with that. he's made pragmatic arguments more than this moral framework of an argument. i think maybe there's a lesson there for the white house from mandela. >> also need to think about what mandela was able to accomplish in the arc of history. it was years, very methodical -- even when they were in prison, they were planning for when they got out and what the government needed to look like. that was years and years and years. years and years of a lot of pressure coming from the outside. i actually think if we were going to have any kind of parallel to the united states, we should be asking ourselves what more could we do from the outside to create conditions. part of th
coming over here and competing in the gobble economy. education is at the core of this and goes to connecting that bond that has been broken. >> you have all this evidence that's truly offensive. take the detroit pension ruling. so we know what the ruling was and we know what the effect may be on people's pensions. they will be cut. city employees, firefighters, no matter how the pension deal was cut years ago the pensions will be cut. but before the pensioners receive their pension who gets paid first? the bond holders, the banks, the big boys and then, then the pensioners will get paid. there's something just deeply flawed with what's been going on in this country and it's not one party or the other, it's the whole system and it's a couple of decades that it's been going on. >> there's a suspicion the people who have been having these massive hikes in their compensation packages are not reinvesting necessarily in job growth and productivity. they are actually -- it feels to a lot of americans on main street like funny money, it's getting recycled, reput into investment funds t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101